Residential Care

Residential care refers to any group living arrangement where children are looked after by paid staff in a specially designated facility. It covers a wide variety of settings ranging from emergency shelters and small group homes, to larger-scale institutions such as orphanages or children’s homes. As a general rule, residential care should only be provided on a temporary basis, for example while efforts are made to promote family reintegration or to identify family based care options for children. In some cases however, certain forms of residential care can operate as a longer-term care solution for children.

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Sadiyya Haffejee, Diane Thembekile Levine - Child Abuse & Neglect,

The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and impact of the pandemic and the resulting social isolation on the wellbeing and protection of children living in a residential care facility.

Nicole Gilbertson Wilke, Amanda Hiles Howard, Philip Goldman - Child Abuse & Neglect,

The goal of the present study was to better understand the scope and characteristics of rapid return, and to provide data-informed recommendations for service providers working with this population.

Alison Gerard, Emma Colvin, Andrew McGrath - Prisons and Community Corrections,

This chapter provides an overview of one of the key factors implicated in young people’s contact with the criminal justice system: the criminalisation of children with care experience.

Jennifer Rasell - Care of the State,

This chapter from Care of the State: Relationships, Kinship and the State in Children’s Homes in Late Socialist Hungary centres on relationships outside the family, namely to carers, teachers, villagers and peers, as well as belonging to an ethnic community.

Jennifer Rasell - Care of the State,

This chapter from Care of the State: Relationships, Kinship and the State in Children’s Homes in Late Socialist Hungary looks at child protection in Hungary from the 1950s to the 1980s, arguing that the organisational structures of state welfare bolstered parent-child ties yet restricted sibling relations.

Jennifer Rasell - Care of the State,

The concluding chapter of Care of the State: Relationships, Kinship and the State in Children’s Homes in Late Socialist Hungary ​​​​​​​draws together the main findings of the author's research into the changing relationships and kinship ties of children who lived in state residential care in socialist Hungary.

Jennifer Rasell - Care of the State,

This chapter of Care of the State: Relationships, Kinship and the State in Children’s Homes in Late Socialist Hungary ​​​​​​​explores negotiations between parents and state officials about the care of their children, showing that gendered norms of parenting and ‘appropriate’ family units were implicit parts of child protection policies in state socialist Hungary.

Jennifer Rasell,

Care of the State blends archival, oral history, interview and ethnographic data to study the changing relationships and kinship ties of children who lived in state residential care in socialist Hungary.

Jennifer Rasell - Care of the State,

The various examples in this chapter from Care of the State: Relationships, Kinship and the State in Children’s Homes in Late Socialist Hungary ​​​​​​​ show that children in care continued to have relations with their parents either figuratively or actually.

Jennifer Rasell - Care of the State,

This introductory chapter presents the conceptual framework for the book 'Care of the State: Relationships, Kinship and the State in Children’s Homes in Late Socialist Hungary.'