Social Service Workforce Strengthening

A strong social service workforce is critical to meeting the needs of children without adequate family care.  From government policy-makers, local administrators, researchers and social workers, to educators, community workers and care providers, social service actors play a key role in protecting girls and boys and promoting their care.

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ESARO Regional Learning Platform on Care Reform,

The Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Learning Platform hosted a webinar on September 20, 2022, with panel of experts who explored how the social service workforce can be strengthened to support care reform in Eastern and Southern Africa.

Global Social Service Workforce Alliance,

Drawing from a review of global reports and case studies, as well as from information sourced from Global Social Service Workforce Alliance members, this report brings to light the critical role of the social service workforce in different humanitarian contexts—including those related to armed conflict, natural disasters and widespread disease outbreaks—and across the emergency management cycle. It further highlights the challenges and key areas of learning in deploying social service workers in humanitarian contexts.

What Works for Children's Social Care,

This study aimed to synthesize existing qualitative UK evidence on the known safeguarding risks and poorer outcomes for disabled children and young people who are at risk of, or who have experienced abuse. This study focused on research, which had sought the views of disabled children and young people, parents/carers and practitioners.

Mariana Negrão, Maria Ana Mendonça, Elisa Veiga, Lurdes Veríssimo, Marina Moreira,

The main goal of this exploratory and descriptive study is to understand the perceptions of Portuguese child protection professionals concerning Family foster care. 101 participants, from different professional backgrounds and child protection contexts, filled out a questionnaire. Main findings show a heterogeneous degree of familiarity to FFC, and a generally positive although reserved attitude to it.

Patricia Fronek, Karen Smith Rotabi-Casares,

This is the first comprehensive book that provides accessible, international knowledge for practitioners, students and academics about social work in health emergencies and spans fields of practice across world regions with particular reference to the COVID-19 pandemic. The book is relevant to a wide range of audiences, including practitioners, educators and students in social work, human services, international development and public health, as well as policy makers and researchers.

Sherilyn MacGregor, Seema Arora-Jonsson, Maeve Cohen,

The aim of this report is to fill a knowledge gap by examining the points of interaction between climate change impacts and the amount, distribution, and conditions of unpaid care work. We focus on care workers rather than those who are cared for, while stressing the relational nature of care and acknowledging
that carers too require care.

CELCIS,

This CELSIS briefing builds on the 2019 briefing, Access to Care Records, which outlined the legislative and policy context in Scotland around care records. This briefing is for all practitioners involved in writing, managing and/or supporting access to care records, and draws on research, campaigning work, and knowledge from organisations and local authorities across Scotland including in social work and information governance teams.

The Alliance for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action,

A poster for Child Protection teams to emphasize the evidence based practices of engaging volunteers that were documented in the research.

Diana Morelen, Julia Najm, Megan Wolff, Kelly Daniel,

his study examined the relationships between COVID-related stress, mental health and professional burnout in the infant and early child mental health (IECMH) workforce and examined reflective supervision and consultation (RSC) as a potential protective factor in the context of COVID-related stress.

Sarah Banks, Nikki Rutter,

This article explores responses of 41 UK social workers to ethical challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, utilising UK data from an international qualitative survey and follow-up interviews in 2020. Challenges ranged from weighing individual rights/ needs against public health risks, to deciding whether to follow government/agency rules and guidance.