Adoption and Kafala

Adoption is the formal, permanent transfer of parental rights to a family other than a child’s own and the formal assumption by that family of all parenting duties for the child. Where a child’s parents are living and their parental rights have not been terminated, they must provide informed consent for adoption. In some countries it is not culturally acceptable to give the parental rights to a non-family member, and therefore alternative long-term care options must be pursued e.g. kinship care. In some Islamic countries, the term ‘Kafala’ of Islamic law is used to describe a situation similar to adoption, but not necessarily with the severing of family ties, the transference of inheritance rights, or the change of the child’s family name.   

 

Displaying 1 - 10 of 483

Joan Moore,

This book outlines narrative and dramatic approaches to improve vulnerable family relationships. It provides a model which offers new ways for parents to practise communicating with their children and develop positive relationships.

Juan José Hernández-Morante, et al -Nutrition,

The objective of this study was to evaluate the health status and anthropometrical development of adopted children from Ethiopia living in southern Spain.

Fabienne Hornfeck, Ina Bovenschen, Sabine Heene, Janin Zimmermann, Annabel Zwönitzer, Heinz Kindler - Child Abuse & Neglect,

This study analyzes the influence of children’s preadoptive history and adoptive parents’ characteristics on the psychosocial adjustment of nationally and internationally adopted children in Germany.

Yolanda Sánchez-Sandoval, Natalia Jiménez-Luque, Sandra Melero, Violeta Luque, Laura Verdugo - The British Journal of Social Work,

The aim of this article is to review adult adoptees’ demands for post-adoption resources, applicants’ characteristics and resources offered to them.

Carmen Pinto - Adoption & Fostering,

This article presents a case study of a 15-year-old boy whose severe difficulties were understood and formulated in terms of ‘attachment problems’ for many years.

Carmen Pinto - Adoption & Fostering,

Looked after and adopted children are among the most vulnerable in our society and it is well established that they present with a higher prevalence of mental health problems than children who live with their birth family. This article presents a case study of a 15-year-old boy whose severe difficulties were understood and formulated in terms of ‘attachment problems’ for many years.

Ruth Sellers, Amelia Smith, Leslie D Leve, Elizabeth Nixon, Jackie Cassell, Gordon Harold - Adoption & Fostering,

This article summarises how genetically informed research designs can help disentangle genetic from environmental processes underlying psychopathology outcomes for children, and how this evidence can provide improved insights into the development of more effective preventive intervention targets for adoptive and foster families.

Jessaca Leinaweaver - Genealogy,

This article examines place and privacy as two key resources for producing kinship through an analysis of exceptional legal practices in Spain that overdetermine international adoptees’ Spanishness.

Better Care Network ,

This country care review includes the Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Committees' recommendations on the issue of Family Environment and Alternative Care, and other care relevant issues, are highlighted.

Better Care Network,

This country care review includes the care related Concluding Observations adopted by the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Committee on the Rights of the Child.