Children Affected by Armed Conflict and Displacement

Children are especially vulnerable to the effects of war, and frequently represent at least half of the population in a conflict area. They suffer fear and insecurity, and disruption to every aspect of their lives. Children who have been displaced are at an increased risk of sexual and physical violence, disease and malnutrition, and separation from family members. As displaced persons or refugees they may experience severe poverty, abuse, exploitation, and psychosocial distress. 

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James Garbarino, Amy Governale, Danielle Nesi - Child Abuse & Neglect,

This article uses the framework of the CRC to review how the world has studied the involvement of child soldiers in armed conflict.

Better Care Network,

This Country Care Review includes the care-related concluding observations adopted by the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, as well as other care-related concluding observations, ratification dates, and links to the Universal Periodic Review and Hague Intercountry Adoption Country Profile.

Serena Zanella & Manuela De Gaspari - Save the Children,

The child protection in emergencies (CPiE) capacity gaps analysis (CGA) in the West and Central Africa (plus Mauritania) region, targeting CPiE practitioners with 3-5 years of professional experience, aimed to collect and provide information on (1) identified key CPiE capacity gaps and (2) existing and available capacity building initiatives.

Alvhild Strømme, Ewa Sapiezynska, Gunvor Knag Fylkesnes, Keyan Salarkia and Jess Edwards - Save the Children,

This report delves into the differences between boys’ and girls’ experiences through a gendered analysis of the six grave violations of children in conflict, including recruitment of children by armed forces and child abduction. The report makes reference to the vulnerabilities faced by girl heads of household or unaccompanied and separated girls on the move and calls for interventions such as family tracing and reunification, the provision of alternative care for unaccompanied and separated children, and the release and reintegration of children associated with armed forces and armed groups.

Save the Children,

This brief - a supplement to the Stop the War on Children 2020: Gender matters report - highlights the situation of children in conflict zones in West and Central Africa with a focus on gender.

Watchlist on Children and Armed Conflict and Human Rights Watch,

In this joint policy note, Watchlist on Children and Armed Conflict and Human Rights Watch highlight the increasingly worrying trend of military detention of children affected by armed conflict, a trend documented in at least 15 countries affected by armed conflict.

Anne Bentley Waddoups, Hirokazu Yoshikawa, and Kendra Strouf - Annual Review of Developmental Psychology,

This article reviews the effects on children and youth of parent–child separation due to several of the most common reasons that are responsible for the growth in this family circumstance worldwide.

Elizabeth Presler-Marshall, Nicola Jones & Kifah Bani Odeh - Child Indicators Research,

Drawing on qualitative research undertaken with adolescents with disabilities from refugee and host communities in Jordan and the State of Palestine, this article critically interrogates the framing of child neglect, which to date has situated the state as a protector rather than a perpetrator, the narrow understanding of adolescent needs and the responsibility of international actors for ensuring that the full range of human rights of adolescents with disabilities is supported.

The Alliance for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action,

The Minimum Standards for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action (CPMS), originally launched in 2012, set out a common agreement on what needs to be achieved in order for child protection in humanitarian settings to be of adequate quality. Years of implementing the CPMS in diverse settings revealed the need for a more user-friendly version of the Standards that would reflect recent sector learning and evidence; improve guidance on prevention, gender and age inclusion, and other cross-cutting themes; and promote applicability to a broader range of humanitarian contexts. Therefore, the Standards were updated in 2019 through a two-year revision process.

Sara Lim Bertrand and Kristen M. Castrataro - Save the Children Sweden and Save the Children International, East and Southern Africa Regional Office,

This Quick Reference Guide is a practical guide for all stakeholders who hope to implement a government-led, cross-border coordination mechanism for the protection of children who are unaccompanied and separated while in situations of migration or displacement.