Standards of Care

Standards of care are approved criteria for measuring and monitoring the management, provision and quality of child care services and their outcomes. Such standards are required for all child care provision, including day care, kinship, foster and institutional care.

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Better Care Network,

This country care review includes the Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child.

Better Care Network,

This country care review includes the care related Concluding Observations adopted by the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Committee on the Rights of the Child.

Better Care Network,

This Country Care Review includes the care-related concluding observations adopted by the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, as well as other care-related concluding observations, ratification dates, and links to the Universal Periodic Review and Hague Intercountry Adoption Country Profile.

UNICEF Ghana, Department of Social Welfare of the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection,

These Standards for Foster Care are available to all stakeholders engaged in the protection, care and support of children where foster care provision may be required. These Standards are intended to guide social workers and other service providers in monitoring foster care services.

The Council of Europe,

This compilation contributes to the implementation of the objectives of the Action Plan on protecting refugee and migrant children in Europe, adopted by the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe, by bringing together international and European standards on child-friendly practices in the context of migration with illustrations from practice of the kind of initiatives, programmes and procedures that serve to implement these standards.

Arigatou International,

This study examines the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) from the perspective of seven major religions, identifies the important role played by religious communities in advancing the rights and well-being of children over the past 30 years, seeks to identify the common values shared among different religions and the CRC and promotes continued action by religious communities to further implement the CRC in the future.

Becky Smith, Save the Children,

To mark the occasion of the 30th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights on the Child (CRC), a three-day event was held at the UN in Geneva, Switzerland. During the Child Protection session, Becky Smith of Save the Children gave this presentation on Children Without Parental Care.

International Social Service Switzerland and Child Rights Connect,

On 18 November 2019, a workshop led by International Social Service Switzerland and Child Rights Connect was held in Geneva to mark the 30th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights on the Child (CRC), the 10th anniversary of the UN Guidelines on the Alternative Care of Children, and the 5th anniversary of Optional Protocol on the CRC on a communications procedure.

Better Care Network,

This country care review includes the care related Concluding Observations adopted by the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Committee on the Rights of the Child.

The Alliance for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action,

The Minimum Standards for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action (CPMS), originally launched in 2012, set out a common agreement on what needs to be achieved in order for child protection in humanitarian settings to be of adequate quality. Years of implementing the CPMS in diverse settings revealed the need for a more user-friendly version of the Standards that would reflect recent sector learning and evidence; improve guidance on prevention, gender and age inclusion, and other cross-cutting themes; and promote applicability to a broader range of humanitarian contexts. Therefore, the Standards were updated in 2019 through a two-year revision process.