Child Participation

Children have the right to participate in matters affecting their lives and should be enabled to give their opinions, and to have those opinions taken into account. Through participation, children learn self-expression, empowerment and ultimately greater self-esteem.  Children are a diverse group and therefore children of different ages, abilities, backgrounds, races, and both genders should ideally be included in a consultation process.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 247

Ebenezer Cudjoe, Lars Uggerhøj, Alhassan Abdullah - Children and Youth Services Review,

The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of young people with child protection meetings, in order to develop better ways to improve children’s participation in child protection in Ghana.

Sang Jung Lee, Eun Mi An, Ick-Joong Chung - Child Indicators Research,

This study aimed to develop a Korean out-of-home care satisfaction scale. The study sample consisted of 484 children from institutional care, group homes, and foster homes in Korea.

Bromley, Debbie; Sampson, Liz; Brettle-West, Jo; O'Reilly, Michelle - Journal of Child Health Care,

This study used focus groups with 49 Looked-After-Children (LAC) in the UK to explore how to improve communication practices and ways of gaining feedback to facilitate quality improvement across healthcare.

Ruth M.Chambers, et al - Children and Youth Services Review,

This qualitative research study examined foster care alumni’s advice for youth in care, caregivers, and child welfare caseworkers on how to best handle placements moves.

Kholofelo C. Motha, Matthews M. Makgamatha, Sharlene Swartz - HTS Teologiese Studies/ Theological Studies,

This paper presents four case studies of participatory educational research in Africa, including the lived experiences of orphaned children and conceptions of education quality in South Africa.

Annie E. Casey Foundation,

This guide from the Annie E. Casey Foundation in the United States explores authentic youth engagement, including how it benefits young people, why it works and what it looks like in real life.

The Kenya Society of Care Leavers (KESCA), the Uganda Care Leavers (UCL), Better Care Network, and Changing the Way We Care,

This webinar - presented by the Kenya Society of Care Leavers (KESCA), the Uganda Care Leavers (UCL), The Better Care Network and Changing the Way We Care - offered policy makers, practitioners, advocates and careleavers a unique opportunity to listen and learn from two leaders of careleaver associations who highlighted two recent documents that illustrate the careleaver experience within and outside of care.

Randi Juul & Inger Sofie Dahlø Husby - Child & Family Social Work,

Building on 10 qualitative interviews with parents of children in Norwegian Child Welfare Services, this paper discusses parents' views on collaboration between children and child welfare professionals.

Randi Juul & Inger Sofie Dahlø Husby - Child & Family Social Work,

Building on 10 qualitative interviews with parents of children in Norwegian Child Welfare Services, this paper discusses parents' views on collaboration between children and child welfare professionals.

Tea Torbenfeldt Bengtsson, Stine Tankred Luckow - Childhood,

This article explores how children living in foster care create senses of belonging across diverse family relationships. It draws on video diaries made by 11 Danish children living in foster care.