Child Participation

Children have the right to participate in matters affecting their lives and should be enabled to give their opinions, and to have those opinions taken into account. Through participation, children learn self-expression, empowerment and ultimately greater self-esteem.  Children are a diverse group and therefore children of different ages, abilities, backgrounds, races, and both genders should ideally be included in a consultation process.

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Bromley, Debbie; Sampson, Liz; Brettle-West, Jo; O'Reilly, Michelle - Journal of Child Health Care,

This study used focus groups with 49 Looked-After-Children (LAC) in the UK to explore how to improve communication practices and ways of gaining feedback to facilitate quality improvement across healthcare.

Annie E. Casey Foundation,

This guide from the Annie E. Casey Foundation in the United States explores authentic youth engagement, including how it benefits young people, why it works and what it looks like in real life.

The Kenya Society of Care Leavers (KESCA), the Uganda Care Leavers (UCL), Better Care Network, and Changing the Way We Care,

This webinar - presented by the Kenya Society of Care Leavers (KESCA), the Uganda Care Leavers (UCL), The Better Care Network and Changing the Way We Care - offered policy makers, practitioners, advocates and careleavers a unique opportunity to listen and learn from two leaders of careleaver associations who highlighted two recent documents that illustrate the careleaver experience within and outside of care.

Randi Juul & Inger Sofie Dahlø Husby - Child & Family Social Work,

Building on 10 qualitative interviews with parents of children in Norwegian Child Welfare Services, this paper discusses parents' views on collaboration between children and child welfare professionals.

Randi Juul & Inger Sofie Dahlø Husby - Child & Family Social Work,

Building on 10 qualitative interviews with parents of children in Norwegian Child Welfare Services, this paper discusses parents' views on collaboration between children and child welfare professionals.

Tea Torbenfeldt Bengtsson, Stine Tankred Luckow - Childhood,

This article explores how children living in foster care create senses of belonging across diverse family relationships. It draws on video diaries made by 11 Danish children living in foster care.

Jessie Rafeld, Kristen Moeller-Saxone, Sue Cotton, Simon Rice, Katherine Monson, Carol Harvey, Helen Herrman - Health Promotion International,

The Bounce Project is a pilot youth-leadership mental health training programme co-designed with young people who have experienced out-of-home-care (OoHC). In this study, the authors evaluated the Bounce Project from the young people’s perspectives to explore the acceptability, successes and limitations of the training to promote the participant’s mental health and their contribution to system level change.

Better Care Network ,

This country care review includes the Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Committees' recommendations on the issue of Family Environment and Alternative Care, and other care relevant issues, are highlighted.

Amy M. Salazar, Rachel Peterson, Sara Spiers, Garrett Jenkins Adrian Tucker Abigail Bambilla - Washington State University Vancouver,

The purpose of this study is to synthesize and share the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative’s approach to youth engagement. The study’s findings communicate how authentically engaging youth can help both the Jim Casey Initiative and youth-serving systems achieve their desired results.

Adrian D. van Breda & John Pinkerton - Emerging Adulthood,

The special issue of Emerging Adulthood titled “Care-Leaving in Africa” is the first collection of essays on care-leaving by African scholars. This article, coauthored by scholars from North and South, argues in favor of North–South dialogue but highlights several challenges inherent in this, including the indigenizing and thus marginalizing of African experience and scholarship and divergent constructions of key social concepts.