Children Affected by Poverty and Social Exclusion

Around the world, poverty and social exclusion are driving factors behind the placement of children into alternative care.  Families give up their children because they are too poor to care for them, or they feel that it is the best way to help them to access basic services such as education and health care. Discrimination and cultural taboos mean that girls, children with disabilities, ethnic minorities, children with HIV/AIDS and children born out of wedlock, make up a disproportionate number of children abandoned into alternative care.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 343

Helen Clark, Awa Marie Coll-Seck, et al - The Lancet Commissions,

This WHO–UNICEF–Lancet Commission lays the foundations for a new global movement for child health that addresses the two crises of climate change and predatory commercial exploitation, and presents high-level recommendations that position children at the centre of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Amy M. Alberton, G. Brent Angell, Kevin M. Gorey, Stéphane Grenier - Children and Youth Services Review,

The premise of this paper is that Indigenous peoples are multiplicatively oppressed and that these intersecting sites of oppression increase the risk of Indigenous peoples in Canada becoming homeless. The study found that Indigenous identity, involvement in the child welfare system, and level of educational achievement were all significantly associated with experiences of hidden and visible homelessness.

Amy M. Alberton, G. Brent Angell, Kevin M. Gorey, Stéphane Grenier - Children and Youth Services Review,

The premise of this paper is that Indigenous peoples are multiplicatively oppressed and that these intersecting sites of oppression increase the risk of Indigenous peoples in Canada becoming homelessness. Hypotheses were tested using the 2014 panel of Canada’s General Social Survey, including 1081 Indigenous peoples and 23,052 non-Indigenous white participants.

Vanessa V. Klodnick & Gina M. Samuels - Child & Family Social Work,

This research explains how and why homelessness occurs among youth with serious mental health struggles after aging out of residential and transitional living programmes.

Johanna Caldwell & Vandna Sinha - Child Indicators Research,

In this article, the authors examine theoretical and legislative conceptualizations of child neglect in terms of their relationship to the disproportionate involvement of Indigenous children in child welfare across Canada and, more specifically, in Quebec.

Steven Roche - Children and Youth Services Review,

Focusing on the life histories of children and young people living in residential care, this study explores the circumstances of their entry into residential care and their interpretations of these experiences.

Carlos Herruzo, Antonio Raya Trenas, María J. Pino and Javier Herruzo - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health,

The objective of this study was to compare the effects of poverty and physical neglect on the development of problematic externalizing and internalizing behaviors, adaptive skills, and school problems among school children between the ages of 3 and 12.

Amy Bombay, Robyn J. McQuaid, Janelle Young, Vandna Sinha, Vanessa Currie, Hymie Anisman, and Kim Matheson - First Peoples Child & Family Review,

Through an online study, the authors of this paper explored the links between familial (parents/grandparents) Indian Residential School (IRS) attendance and subsequent involvement in the child welfare system (CWS) in a non-representative sample of Indigenous adults in Canada born during the Sixties Scoop era.

Mariette Chartier, et al - Children and Youth Services Review,

This article investigates the efficacy of the Families First Home Visiting (FFHV) program, which aims to enhance parenting skills and strengthen relationships between parents and their children.

Pamhidzayi Berejena Mhongera & Antoinette Lombard - Children and Youth Services Review,

This qualitative, phenomenological study explores experiences of resilience among OVC benefiting from programmes implemented by Future Families (a non-profit organisation) in the Gauteng Province of South Africa.