Parenting Support

Families will require support when faced with problems they are unable to overcome on their own. Ideally support should come from existing networks, such as extended family, religious leaders, and neighbours. Where such support is not available or sufficient, additional family and community services are required. Such services are particularly important for kinship, foster and adoptive caretakers, and child headed households in order to prevent separation and address abuse and exploitation of children. It is also vital for children affected by HIV/AIDS and armed conflict, and those children living on the street.

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World Without Orphans,

This video and attached parenting tips offer simple and practical recommendations for Ukrainian parents on how to help themselves and their children to overcome various crisis situations.

World Without Orphans,

У цьому відео ми пропонуємо прості і практичні рекомендації про те, як у цей непростий час допомагати собі та своїм дітям долати різні кризові ситуації.

Linda-Jeanne M. Mack, Richard P. Barth,

This paper reviews the range of factors state legislation includes in the U.S., reviews scant existing literature on how termination of parental rights (TPRs) may effect youth, and proposes several options for ways that unproductive TPRs can be reduced, and timely reinstatements increased.

Better Care Network,

In this video, Anne Kinuthia, shares how social work practitioners from Kivuli, a residential care service provider in Kenya, used a simple, fun, and non-threatening activity called My Say to help children, families and staff, surface and process their emotions during the organization’s transition.

M. Àngels Balsells Bailón, Aida Urrea-Monclús, Eduard Vaquero Tió, Laura Fernández-Rodrigo,

This research highlights the importance of involving parents and their children in improving parenting skills and the reunification process by implementing parental education programs through a unique work plan. This study examined the experiences of families in the Spanish Child Protection System.

Ann Garbett, UNFPA,

This report’s findings on the prevalence of motherhood in childhood across the globe and repeat adolescent childbearing highlight that more needs to be done to design, implement and evaluate programmes that target the youngest starters and girls at risk of rapid and repeat adolescent births.

WHO, UNICEF, UNHCR, UNODC, Parenting for Lifelong Health, University of Oxford,

WHO, UNICEF, UNHCR, UNODC, Parenting for Lifelong Health, University of Oxford,

WHO, UNICEF, UNHCR, UNODC, Parenting for Lifelong Health, University of Oxford,

This new set of evidence-based parenting tips were developed in response to the war in Ukraine and focus on the prevention of child trafficking and child sexual violence.

Susan J. Rose,

This study examines the perceptions of 145 incarcerated mothers of minor children in a large Midwestern jail to understand the correlation between where their children are living during their incarceration and the mothers’ feelings about these placements and relationships with their children. Mothers were most satisfied if children lived with maternal grandparents, and least satisfied if children were in foster care. Women with higher scores for the relationship with close relatives, those having contact with their child(ren) while incarcerated, and mothers with no children in foster care reported feeling better about these placements. The findings highlight the importance of women maintaining contact with their children and their children’s caretakers while incarcerated.