Kinship Care

Kinship care is the full-time care of a child by a relative or another member of the extended family. This type of arrangement is the most common form of out of home care throughout the world and is typically arranged without formal legal proceedings. In many developing countries, it is essentially the only form of alternative family care available on a significant scale.

 

Displaying 1 - 10 of 548

Family for Every Child,

This webinar shares the process that Family for Every Child is using to facilitate the development of global inter-agency guidance on Kinship Care, aimed at policy makers and programme managers.

Susan Burke, Jane Bouey, Carol Madsen, Louise Costello, Glen Schmidt, Patricia Barkaskas, Nicole White, Caitlin Alder, Rabiah Murium,

This study explores the state of kinship care in British Columbia (BC), Canada 10 years after the implementation of major policy reform designed by the provincial government to improve services to kinship caregivers.

Jeffrey R. Ballaret,

This study investigates how experiences and practices of transnational care arrangements are negotiated from the perspective of the nonparental carers. It specifically aims to understand its dynamics and patterns in shaping care relationships, normative familial values and the hope to reconstitute the family amidst migration-induced care.

Cassandra Cotton, Shelley Clark, Sangeetha Madhavan,

Childrearing in sub-Saharan Africa is often viewed as collaborative, where children benefit from support from kin. For single mothers living in informal settlements, kin networks may be highly dispersed and offer little day-to-day childrearing support, but may provide opportunities for child fostering. This study conducted in Nairobi, Kenya, uses a linked lives approach, where single mothers’ connections with kin and romantic partners may influence whether – and what type of – kin are relied on to support child fostering.

Changing the Way We Care,

These two case studies focus on kinship care: one describes kinship care in the Kenya context and the other describes family-based alternative care in Guatemala, including kinship care. They are meant to help practitioners better understand the practical implications of kinship and other forms of family-based alternative care and inform similar work in other contexts. These case studies have been produced by Changing the Way We CareSM, a global initiative implemented by Catholic Relief Services and Maestral International, and other global, national and local partners working together to change the way we care for children around the world.

Changing the Way We Care,

This case study focuses on kinship care in the Kenya context.

Yanfeng Xu, Sarah Pace, Lauren P. McCarthy, Theresa M. Harrison, Yao Wang,

This systematic review aims to examine the effectiveness of interventions that seek to improve outcomes of grandchildren raised by grandparents.

Jonika B. Hash, Candice A. Alfano, Judith Owens et al,

The goal of this Call to Action is to draw attention to the sleep health of children residing in alternative care settings. It highlights the need for a more robust evidence base to address major knowledge gaps and outline concrete steps toward building future promising sleep health-promoting practices and policies supporting children residing in alternative care settings.

Xi Liang, Yige Lin, Marinus H. Van IJzendoorn, Zhengyan Wang,

Grandmothers are important in Chinese families. This study explored the early emerging mother-grandmother-infant network and its association with a child's socioemotional development in multigenerational families in a non-WEIRD country. 

Child Identity Protection (CHIP),

This research brought together the testimonies of adoption professionals (national and international) concerned with the situation of abandoned and placed children in five South American countries: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia and Peru. The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of the new realities of adoption, in a context where these countries have chosen to limit or stop their foreign adoption practices.