Gatekeeping

"Gatekeeping," as it is used on this web site, is the process of referring children and families to appropriate services or care arrangements with the aim of limiting the number of inappropriate placements. Gatekeeping is an essential tool in diverting children from unnecessary initial entry into alternative care, and reducing the numbers of children entering institutions. Gatekeeping is often carried out by social welfare professionals or trained staff at institutions, but is often aided by members of the community and local service providers.

   

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CELCIS & Working Group on Children without Parental Care of the NGO Group for the Convention on the Rights of the Child,

This handbook (in Mandarin) is designed as a tool for legislators, policy-makers, and all professionals and care providers to support the implementation of the Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children, endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly in 2009.

Centre for Excellence for Looked After Children in Scotland (CELCIS),

This handbook, Moving Forward: Implementation of the ‘Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children,’ is aimed at legislators, policy-makers and decision-makers, as well as professionals and care providers, to support the implementation of the Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children, endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly in 2009. It explains the key thrusts of the Guidelines, outlines the kind of policy responses required, and describes ‘promising’ examples of efforts already made to apply them in diverse communities, countries, regions and cultures.

CELCIS & Working Group on Children without Parental Care of the NGO Group for the Convention on the Rights of the Child,

This handbook (in Russian) is designed as a tool for legislators, policy-makers, and all professionals and care providers to support the implementation of the Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children, endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly in 2009.

CELCIS & Working Group on Children without Parental Care of the NGO Group for the Convention on the Rights of the Child,

This handbook (in German) is designed as a tool for legislators, policy-makers, and all professionals and care providers to support the implementation of the Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children, endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly in 2009.

European Union,

This Recommendation by the European Commission on Investing in Children, stresses the importance of early intervention and preventative approaches, and makes quality childcare one of its key policy areas to break the cycle of disadvantage in early years and reduce the risk of child poverty and social exclusion.

Partnerships for Every Child, Ministry of Labour, Social Protection and Family of Moldova, Ministry of Education of Moldova, USAID, VIITORUL,

This 10-page newsletter, translated into English, is issue number two of a series produced by the “Protecting children of Moldova from family separation, violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation” project, which is implemented by Partnerships for Every Child, the Ministry of Labour, Social Protection and Family of Moldova, and the Ministry of Education of Moldova.

Elizabeth Fernandez, Nicola Atwool,

This article provides an outline of the early development of care and protection in Australia and New Zealand as a backdrop to an overview of child protection systems and policies and the current child protection profile in both countries. An overview of trends in relation to out of home care, including routes into care, care arrangements and permanency policies is provided.

Partnerships for Every Child, Ministry of Labour, Social Protection and Family of Moldova, Ministry of Education, USAID, EveryChild, VIITORUL,

This newsletter, translated into English, is the first of three issues produced by the “Protecting children of Moldova from family separation, violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation” project, which is implemented by Partnerships for Every Child, the Ministry of Labour, Social Protection and Family of Moldova, and the Ministry of Education of Moldova.

Roxana Anghel, Maria Herczog, Gabriela Dima,

This paper discusses the challenges of reforming the child welfare and protection systems in Hungary and Romania -two countries in transition from socialism to capitalism- and the impact on children, young people, families, and professionals. The focus is on the efforts made to deinstitutionalise children from large institutions, develop local prevention services, and develop alternatives to institutional care.

The Indian Ministry of Women and Child Development,

In its Annual report (2011-2012), the Indian Ministry of Women and Child Development reports on progress in the implementation of the Integrated Child Protection Scheme (ICPS), a new policy and programmatic strategy that specifically articulates the need to move away in approach and services from over-reliance on institutional care and towards responses that support family based care.