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Ukraine

Demographic Data

26.1
Gini Coefficiency
World Bank, 2018
44.01 million
Total Population
UNPD, 2018
17.5%
Percent Population Under 18
 
UNICEF MICS, 2012
lower middle-income country
World Bank GNI Status
World Bank, 2018
0.751
High Human Development
Human Development Index
UNDP Human Development Report, 2018
1.3%
Living Below Poverty Line
 
World Bank, 2018
2.5
People
Median Household Size
United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2019); DHS, 2007

Children's Living Arrangement

Children's Living Arrangements

Add New Data Data and Resources
%
Country
 
NO SOURCE GIVEN
72.7%
Living with Both Parents
 
MICS, 2012
i
aged 0-17
20.6%
Living with Mother Only
 
MICS, 2012
i
aged 0-17
1.4%
Living with Father Only
 
MICS, 2012
i
aged 0-17
2.7%
Living with Neither Parent
 
MICS, 2012
i
aged 0-17
0.5%
Living in Kinship Care with One Parent Dead
 
MICS, 2012
i
aged 0-17
0.5%
Living in Kinship Care with Both Parents Dead
 
MICS, 2012
i
aged 0-17
%
Effective
 
NO SOURCE GIVEN

Children Living without Biological Parent

Children Living Without Biological Parents

Add New Data Data and Resources

Children at Risk of Separation

Children at Risk of Separation

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Children living below poverty line
NO DATA AVAILABLE
Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
Children with Disabilities
NO DATA AVAILABLE
Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
Children experiencing violence
NO DATA AVAILABLE
Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
Disability of a parent
NO DATA AVAILABLE
Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
Parental substance abuse
NO DATA AVAILABLE
Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
Parents' experience of being brought up in care institutions
NO DATA AVAILABLE
Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
Child victims of armed conflict
NO DATA AVAILABLE
Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
Parenting stress
NO DATA AVAILABLE
Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018

Formal Alternative Care Arrangements

Formal Alternative Care Arrangements

Add New Data Data and Resources
Settings
Children
NO SOURCE GIVEN
Settings
Children
NO SOURCE GIVEN
Formal Family-Based Care
0 Settings
0 Children
NO SOURCE GIVEN
Foster Care
0 Settings
0 Children
NO SOURCE GIVEN
Kinship Care
0 Settings
0 Children
NO SOURCE GIVEN
0 Settings
0 Children
NO SOURCE GIVEN
Institutional Care
0 Settings
106000 Children
Ukrainian Child Right Network, 2018
Small Group Homes
500 Settings
0 Children
i
Small group homes are defined as residential care for 0-10 children. The number of settings is an estimate.
Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
0 Settings
0 Children
NO SOURCE GIVEN

Adoption

NO DATA AVAIABLE
Country
NO SOURCE GIVEN
1518
children
Domestic Adoption
Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
i
Date Range: 2017
323
children
Inter-country Adoption
Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
i
Date Range: 2017
NO DATA AVAIABLE
Effective
NO SOURCE GIVEN

Key Reform Indicators/Progress Markers

Country
 
NO SOURCE GIVEN
Effective
 
NO SOURCE GIVEN
NO DATA AVAILABLE
Social Welfare Spending
NO SOURCE GIVEN
Alternative Care Policy in line with the 2009 Guidelines
 
No Data
Cabinet of Ministers’ Resolution on Conditions and Functioning of Guardianship Care Authorities #866; The Law of Ukraine for Ensuring Organizational and Regulatory Conditions for Social Protection of Orphan Children and Children without Parental Care
Centralised authority on adoption
 
No Data
NO SOURCE GIVEN
Commitment to Deinstitutionalistion/Reforms
 
Yes
State program for reforming care institutions for children without parental care; 2017 National Strategy for reforming institutional care and upbringing of children lacking parental care
Comprehensive child protection law
 
Yes
Source: Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
i
The Law of Ukraine on Protection of Childhood, The Law of Ukraine for Ensuring Organizational and Regulatory Conditions for Social Protection of Orphan Children and Children without Parental Care, The Family Code of Ukraine, The Civil Code of Ukraine; Law of Ukraine for prevention of and addressing to violence; Law of Ukraine on Access of Personal Data and Information; Law on public service; Law on Social Services
Continuum of alternative care services available
 
Yes
Source: Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
i
The continuum of care services includes: formal foster care, supervised independent living, mother and baby units, emergency reception/transit centers, group homes, institutions/large scale residential care facilities, boarding schools/internats, specialist residential care for children with disabilities
Data System
 
No Data
NO SOURCE GIVEN
Existence of a regulatory body and regulatory system
 
Yes
Source: Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
i
The regulatory system includes the following mechanisms: Guardianship body; Local administration notice and registration with the local authorities; Registration in the statutory DB; training participation and completion; visit of the statutory agency representative; and the line ministries follow-up on implementation of the standards in specific facilities subordinate to them. The Ombudsperson monitors implementation of standards in specific services following referrals of special cases under the National Preventive Mechanism (NPM). Ombudsperson is a semi-governmental independent body, appointed by the Parliament and accountable only to the Parliament. Under the National Preventive Mechanism (NPM) the ombudsperson has the right to monitor any facility, institution, service existing in the country. Care providers have to verify conformity with the national accounting regulations and registration with finance/tax authorities.
Gatekeeping mechanism/policy
 
Yes
Source: Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
i
When the office of the child protection service starts a case for the child as for the child-orphan, a child deprived of parental care and a child who found herself or himself in difficult life circumstances - there is a requirement to carry out an assessment of the needs of this child and to draw up an individual plan for social protection of the child.
Means of tracking progress with reforms
 
Yes
The Ukrainian Child Rights Network utilized the Tracking Progress Initiative Tool in 2018
Moratorium on admission into institutions for children under 3
 
Yes
Source: Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
i
Children under 3 can only be placed in a facility under the MoH or family-base care. The moratorium on placement of children under 3 into residential care was to become enforceable in 2020. There are also DE-I plans at the national, regional and local levels. If family-based forms of care are available in a given locale, children from 0 -3 are placed into those as a matter of priority
Moratorium on new institutions
 
No Data
NO SOURCE GIVEN
National Action Plan
 
Yes
Source: Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
i
State program for reforming care institutions for children without parental care; 2017 National Strategy for reforming institutional care and upbringing of children lacking parental care - The strategy is planned for the 10 year period: 2017 to 2026. The strategy plans to deinstitutionalize the whole system of care for children. It also covers the institutions such as boarding schools/internats, which formally represent “education” facilities but in reality operate as childcare institutions. The strategy aims to develop and strengthen the social work and social services’ workforce. It also aims to develop throughout the country the network of family-based and family-like care alternatives, which are to replace all large-scale residential institutions.
National Standards of Care
 
Partly
Source: Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
i
Cabinet of Ministers' Decree #565; resolution of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine; resolution of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine #564; decrees of the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine, Ministry of Social Policy and Ministry of Health (baby homes). Case managers are assigned to each placement to monitor implementation of standards, i.e. existence of complaints mechanisms, but large scale residential facilities are not compelled to meet minimum standards and the existence of complaints mechanism is not required from such facilities
Prevention of Separation Services available
 
Limited
Source: Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
i
There are local programs for prevention of /addressing causes of social orphanhood. There is an extremely limited range of social services for parents and children who are facing difficult life circumstances. On one hand, this situation is caused by insufficient number and lack of professional skills of specialists providing statutory social services. On the other hand, there is an undeveloped market of social service provision from the side of non-governmental organizations.
Support for careleavers (in legislation and in practice)
 
Yes
State Standard of the Social Service "Social Integration of the Children Leaving Institutional Care" (approved by the Order of the Ministry of Social Policy)
i
Support for careleavers is written out in legislation, and resolution of the cabinet of ministers. Supports include: New clothes and shoes (not less than 12 minimum), cash assistance ( not less 2.5 non-taxable minimum income), free bedding, free food in canteens, annual allowance for study materials (3 social stipend), social stipend not less 8 non-taxable minimum income; holiday per diems and travel costs to visit the families/facilities where one was raised; start-up assistance before employment to cover clothing, footwear, houseware appliances, bedding etc; and single-time cash payment for those reaching 18 years of age amounting to the sum as defined by the resolution of the cabinet of ministers. From the time they are 16 years old, children in care are put onto the queue for social housing. Care-leavers also qualify for free education and, while in studies, free dormitory, study materials, canteen, clothing and footwear, social support, one-time cash payments when reaching 18 years old and upon graduation from an education institution. Careleavers also receive professional orientation/support in selection of a profession (contracts with selected vocation education facilities). Preparation for independent living (cooking, budgeting, etc) is prescribed by the State Standard of the Social Service "Social Integration of the Children Leaving Institutional Care"

Social Work Force

Workers
NO SOURCE GIVEN
Country
Workers
NO SOURCE GIVEN
Effective
A national workforce assessment and analysis carried out within the past four years
 
No Data
NO SOURCE GIVEN
A system of licensing/registration of social service professionals
 
No Data
NO SOURCE GIVEN

Other Relevant Reforms

Other Relevant Reforms

Add New Data Data and Resources
Effective
NO SOURCE GIVEN
Child Protection
i
--
Constitution of Ukraine. Law of Ukraine for prevention of and addressing violence.
--
Source: Ukrainian Child Rights Network, 2018
i
Law on education and secondary legislation guarantees access to education to all children in all forms of care, formal as well as informal. The constitution also has a record guaranteeing free secondary education.

Key Research Sources

Country
Effective

Drivers of Institutionalisation

Drivers of Institutionaliziation

Add New Data Data and Resources
Country
Push Factors
Pull Factors
Effective

Displaying 1 - 10 of 48

List of Organisations

Maria Varenikova - The New York Times,

"In one of the more bizarre consequences of coronavirus travel restrictions, biological parents, babies and surrogate mothers have become scattered and sometimes stranded in multiple countries for months this year," says this article from the New York Times that describes the situation of surrogates and babies waiting to be retrieved in Ukraine.

Valeria Perasso - BBC News,

This article from BBC News describes the impacts of coronavirus lockdowns on surrogacy arrangements, particularly the separation of parents and their babies, born to surrogate mothers in Ukraine, who are unable to unite due to travel restrictions.

Victoria Sydorenko, Alla Kovalchuk - The Asian International Journal of Life Sciences,

The study substantiates the organizational, psychological, pedagogical and socio-legal principles of creating a safe educational environment for children deprived of parental care, providing the proper conditions for their socialization, harmonious physical, mental, moral and volitional, and spiritual development.

V. Borysova - Yearbook of Ukrainian Law,

The purpose of the article is to analyze the approaches developed in the legal doctrine to understanding the forms of placement of children deprived of parental care and upbringing, and also to outline a vision of how to overcome orphanhood in Ukraine through the introduction of both legalized family forms of placement of such children, which are prioritized over residential forms of upbringing and the unregulated ones.

Child Protection Hub,

Join this webinar to walk through the PROMISE Child Participation Tool and to discuss approaches and considerations for soliciting children’s views on their Barnahus experience.

UNICEF,

UNICEF ECARO ECD and Child Protection programmes are seeking a consultant to document the transformation to an ECI Centre of an Infant Home in Kharkiv, Ukraine.

UNICEF and Child Protection Hub,

The purpose of this webinar is to shed light on the specific experiences and issues of unaccompanied and separate girls in the European Response.

Samantha Hawley - ABC News,

This article from ABC News in Australia investigates the phenomenon of Australian and other foreign couples who "commission" surrogates in Ukraine, only to abandon the babies after they are born.

Opening Doors for Europe's Children,

This factsheet highlights the developments and challenges still ahead in Ukraine and offers key recommendations to the EU and the national government to ensure that children are cared for in family-based settings.

Dr. Muireann Ní Raghallaigh - FORUM,

This article is written as part of the FORUM project (FOR Unaccompanied Minors: transfer of knowledge for professionals to increase foster care), an EU funded project which sought to enhance the capacity of professionals to provide quality foster care for unaccompanied migrant children, primarily through the transfer of knowledge. The article aims to contribute to this transfer of knowledge by bringing together literature which is of relevance to professionals developing or enhancing foster care services for unaccompanied migrant children.