Americas

This page contains documents and other resources related to children's care in the Americas. Browse resources by region, country, or category.

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List of Organisations

Kevin J. Ruiz-Romero, María D.Salas Francisco, Javier Fernández-Baena, Lucía González-Pasarín,

In this scoping review the authors analyze the findings of studies conducted over the past two decades that have specifically examined face-to-face contact with birth parents for children in non-kinship foster care, with the goal of determining more clearly when it may contribute positively to the child's well-being. The review involved a search of nine electronic databases in Spain, the U.S., Portugal, and the UK.

Transforming Children's Care Global Collaborative Platform,

The Task Force on Foster Care of the Transforming Children's Care Global Collaborative Platform held the fifth webinar in the spotlight series on Foster Care Practice on 15 September 2022. The webinar explored participation in foster care with particular focus on individual decision making for children and young people. We heard from people with lived experience of foster care in different contexts, including Uganda, Ireland and Argentina.

Human Rights Watch,

New Scorecard Gives Only 4 a ‘C’ Grade; 46 Get ‘D’ or ‘F’

Rebecca Maria Torresa, Kate Swanson, Caroline Fariaa, Tamara Segura Herrerac, Sarah Blue,

Despite rising numbers of unaccompanied child migrants in the Americas, very limited research directly engages with youth as they journey north to seek protection in the United States. In this article, the authors examine young Central American migrant experiences of bordering, focusing on policing and shelter management.

Micki Washburn, Miao Yua, Catherine LaBrenz, Ashley N. Palmer,

This U.S.-based study seeks to determine if COVID-19 has resulted in unique impacts on foster care alumni, and if these impacts are the same for LGBTQ+ and non-LGBTQ+ transition age youth.

Charles H. Zeanah, Lucy S. King,

This report reviewed evidence for the effects of psychosocial neglect on development derived from studies of young children raised in U.S. institutions. In these caregiving environments, children are physically safe and receive instrumental care, but the social, emotional, and cognitive components of caregiving are impoverished. The damaging and often lasting effects of these caregiving environments on young children's development underscore that psychosocial neglect should be considered as dangerous to child well-being as physical maltreatment.

Micki Washburn, Miao Yua, Catherine LaBrenza, Ashley N. Palmer,

This U.S.-based study seeks to determine if COVID-19 has resulted in unique impacts on foster care alumni, and if these impacts are the same for LGBTQ+ and non-LGBTQ+ transition age youth.

Sheila R. van Berkel, Marielle J. L. Prevoo, Marielle Linting, Fieke Pannebakker, Lenneke R. A. Alink,

The aim of this study was to investigate (a) the extent to which child maltreatment co-occurs with parental separation and (b) associations between different types of child maltreatment and various types of separation-associated interparental conflict. This cross-national comparative study on family dynamics was based on National survey data of the US, Russia and 17 European countries indicates that in these countries 10–44% of the couples with children had separated before one of their children reached the age of 15 years.

Linda-Jeanne M. Mack, Richard P. Barth,

This paper reviews the range of factors state legislation includes in the U.S., reviews scant existing literature on how termination of parental rights (TPRs) may effect youth, and proposes several options for ways that unproductive TPRs can be reduced, and timely reinstatements increased.

Eve S. Puffer, Savannah L. Johnson, Kaitlin N. Quick, Amber D. Rieder, Mahgul Mansoor, Rae Jean Proeschold-Bell, Sierra Jones, Shaneeka Moore-Lawrence, Justin D. Rasmussen, Cameron Cucuzzella, Francelia Burwell, Latoria Dowdy, Florine Moore, Nancy Rosales,

COVID-19 led to widespread disruption of services that promote family well-being. Families impacted most were those already experiencing disparities due to structural and systemic barriers. Existing support systems faded into the background as families became more isolated. New approaches were needed to deliver evidence-based, low-cost interventions to reach families within communities. The authors adapted a family strengthening intervention developed in Kenya (“Tuko Pamoja”) for the United States.