Europe

This page contains documents and other resources related to children's care in Europe. Browse resources by region, country, or category.

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List of Organisations

Life Book for Youth, FICE Netherland, Het Begint Bij Mij, University of Groningen,

Since the start of war in Ukraine, more than 4 million people have fled, half of whom are children. As of today there is the Mylifejourneybook for these children: an activity book in which children can write their experiences of the journey, but also their memories of Ukraine and their hopes for the future. The book can be downloaded free of charge for everyone at www.lifebookforyouth.com/mylifejourneybook

María del Carmen Manzo Chávez,

The causes of institutionalization are multiple and the impact it causes is reflected in different areas such as the development of the child in general, such as mental, psychic structuring, health, and nutrition. Psychologically, children present alterations in their cognitive, emotional, sexual, and social domains with a high probability of developing several pathological conditions. This chapter presents an overview of this phenomenon based on several research investigations carried out in Spain, Latin America, and Mexico.

The Commission on Young Lives,

This report highlights the changing characteristics of children in and on the ‘edge of care’, including unaccompanied minors, increasing numbers of young people with unmet complex needs and BAME young people.

British Association of Social Workers,

In this summary report, the British Association of Social Workers (BASW) presents the findings of its 2021 annual survey providing an insight into the state
of the profession, the views of social workers and student social workers on key topics and the ongoing impact of working during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. The survey was launched in December 2021 as a place for social workers to reflect on their profession and their experiences in the preceding twelve months.

Sarah Banks, Nikki Rutter,

This article explores responses of 41 UK social workers to ethical challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, utilising UK data from an international qualitative survey and follow-up interviews in 2020. Challenges ranged from weighing individual rights/ needs against public health risks, to deciding whether to follow government/agency rules and guidance.

SOS Children's Villages, European Union,

This basic awareness-raising course is for anyone who may come into contact with children and young people in alternative care settings. The aim of the course is to provide a brief understanding of trauma, the impact it can have on the lives of children and young people, and ways to support those who may be affected by it.

Eurochild and UNICEF,

This policy brief summarises the policy context, as well as the key findings and recommendations from the analysis of the national responses to the DataCare survey across Europe. More detailed information can be found in the full research report: Better Data for Better Child Protection Systems in Europe: Mapping how data on children in alternative care are collected, analysed, and published across 28 European countries, which includes a full set of country profiles.

Eurochild and UNICEF,

This report was conceptualised jointly by Eurochild and the UNICEF Europe and Central Asia Regional Office (ECARO) and builds on the Eurochild report on alternative care in Europe published in 2009. It also includes a full set of country profiles.

Eurochild and UNICEF,

The DataCare Project was launched by Eurochild with support from UNICEF in March 2020. The project aims to carry out a comprehensive mapping of child protection data systems across the 27 Member States of the European Union (EU) and the UK. In addition to providing an overview of the situation of children in alternative care in Europe, this project aims to inform EU efforts to agree to comparable benchmarks and indicators to monitor progress in child protection reforms across Europe.

Community Care,

The analysis of the Step Up to Social Work and Frontline programmes found participants of both, while highly trained and valued by employers, often found the move to a full caseload a “major step up”.

But it said that “dissonance” between an idealised conception of social work and experience of local authority practice – leading to “disappointment” – was much more pronounced among graduates of the latter programme.